How to Remember (and Use) Your Dreams

The other night I dreamt I was about to go on stage in front of thousands of people, to play bass with the Stones.  Only I don’t know how to play.  And unlike flying or breathing underwater, I didn’t know how to do it in the dream, either. Here I was gonna be standing next to Charlie Watts, a frikkin’ awesome drummer and one of my heroes. And I’m clueless. Clue. Less.  It still gives me the willies when I recall it.

I'm not worthy...I'm not worthy....

I’m not worthy…I’m not worthy….

I know where that particular dream came from: reading an article about the band in Rolling Stone earlier. But there are other dreams that offer up more than just a psychedelic rehash of the day.

Like those wonderful ones where you encounter someone you’ve lost and they look wonderful.  They practically shine.  And you know – you just know –that they’ve visited you from the Other Side. Or the one where you get a “preview” of something that’s about to happen.   This is where dreams serve a really useful purpose, to “download” info from other dimensions.  Our conscious brain is in “sleep” mode – literally – so we can access different channels.

You may not think you dream, but you do.  It’s a vital physical function; in fact, I think I read somewhere that, when test subjects were prevented from dreaming (as in, being woken up repeatedly), they got really sick.  Umm, for the record?  I would cut a bitch if someone did that to me.  Anyway, the point is you do indeed dream — you just aren’t so hot on remembering them.

Dreaming is where we work stuff out on the physical plane, but more importantly, its where we access higher dimensions.  Training yourself to remember what you learn in Dreamland is not as hard as you might think.

First, keep a notebook and pen by your bed.  Second, set your intention to start remembering your dreams  As you drift off, tell yourself that you WILL recall what you’ve experienced in the dream state.  If you wake up in the middle of the night from a dream, jot down what you remember.  Do NOT tell yourself that you’ll do it in the morning.  Trust me, you probably won’t.   So roll over, turn on the light for 10 seconds and scrawl it down. Just like Jerry Seinfeld with his awesome idea for a joke…..which he then couldn’t read.

When you first wake up from a dream, try not to move.  This will keep you in that state between the worlds where it will be easier to consciously recall what you’ve experienced.  Once you’ve captured a theme, image, whatever jot it in your notebook.

If something really stands out, ask yourself what it means – then go with the first impression or thought that you get.  Don’t overthink it.  Stay in that muted place where things flow without a lot of intellect behind them.  Dreams reach us on a very subtle level; use more of your gut to interpret them, and less your brain.

There are some great dream interpretation books  ( I like Mary Summer Rain’s Guide to Dream Symbols) and sites out there, but don’t discount what your own bad self tells you.

Once you’ve built up your recall muscle, you can direct your dreams towards something specific.  For example, you can invite a deceased loved one to visit you in the dream state.  Don’t force this; they have things going on on the Other Side. They don’t sit around, flipping through Us magazine, waiting for your call. Make the invitation, then let it go.  Trying too hard blocks the energy.

You can also ask your Spirit Guides to provide an answer to a question by way of your dreams.  Even if you don’t know who your guide(s) is, simply throw up a request for information.  You can assign them a name if you want, or just say, “Yo, Guides – I need some help here with (fill in the blank).”  They don’t stand on formality.  Then see what they send you.  And don’t be surprised if the answer/info you get is different than what you expect.  Receive it with grace and say “thank you.”

Better than one of these!

Better than one of these!

One note – don’t get frustrated if you don’t get anywhere in remembering your dreams. Keep setting the intention, and eventually you will.

There’s an old folk trick to help the dream recall process along.  Place a glass of water by your bed.  When you first wake up, drink it down to help remember.  Or to get the stank morning breath out of your mouth.  In the meantime, enjoy a blast from my 80s past.  And the exquisite Annie Lennox.  In my dreams, I have her voice.  In real life, my singing voice is closer to Linda McCartney’s.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s