Talk to Your Pet: Some How-To’s

I’m big on combos:  Peanut butter and jelly. Solids and stripes. Jagger and Richards. So it wasn’t a huge leap to combine my psychic ability with my love for critters and become an Animal Communicator.

"More cowbell!"

“More cowbell!”

Learning to tweak the radar to interact with animals has been a profound experience.  Besides the unconditional love and humor they share, I’ve been struck by the untamed spirit that each animal brings to a session. Even the most docile housecat is still linked to the wild essence of the Earth. These encounters remind me of the powerful connection between all forms of life.

One of the most important lessons Animal Communication has taught me is to respect their unique place in the universe. We assume that, as humans, we’re superior to those lower down the food chain.  Just ‘cause your dog rolls around in goose poop at the park or your cat chases shadows on the wall, do not take this as a sign that they don’t know what’s really going on.  Animals demonstrate unconditional love, endless forgiveness, a massive capacity for joy and plenty of loyalty. How many people do you know like that?  Didn’t think so.

Still more spiritual than you.....

Still more spiritual than you…..

Respect for an animal is key to communicating with them.

I can’t just start demanding they talk to me. Instead, I need to relax, quiet my ego and wait until they feel comfortable. I mean, imagine if a total stranger came barging into your living room and started trying to get you to reveal details about a personal issue?  Oh yeah, that’s Dr. Phil.  But if it happened, you’d probably want to run and hide, just like a shy kittycat.
 So I give the critters some space.  And some r-e-s-p-e-c-t.

Respect -- it's not just for Miss 'retha anymore...

Respect — it’s not just for Miss ‘retha anymore…

And when they talk?  Their conversations are refreshingly simple, direct,  and without all the hoo-ha we humans wrap ourselves in.

My cat Pyewacket frequently tells me to “lighten up” during the day – then does something silly to make me laugh. A horse calmly told me to assure her nervous owner that she fully intended to win a race she was entered in – despite never having won before — then went on to do it (sorry, I won’t be holding court at the OTB anytime soon). A dog who had passed on when her owner was suddenly called into work told me she purposely wanted it that way, because she knew that, if “Mom” had stayed with her, she would have had a much harder time leaving. Letting her owner know that alleviated a huge burden of guilt.

If you’re an animal lover, you’ve most likely had a conversation or two already.  You just didn’t consider it as such.  Like I said, animals talk very simply and directly.  There’s no need for them to really “think it over” –they say what they feel.  And the act of receiving intuitive impressions is actually pretty simple – if you’ve ever had a hunch or gut feeling, you’ve experienced it.  We just make it more complicated than it really is.

Kitty says "Be zen."

Kitty says “Be zen.”

Here are some simple steps to talking to your animal friend(s):

1) Quiet your mind. If you don’t already meditate, learn to do so. You need a “clear palate” to receive any intuitive information. Focus on just breathing, letting random thoughts simply pass by. The goal is to not have a completely blank mind (physically impossible), just one that’s not preoccupied with car pools, grocery lists and work stuff.

2) Approach your animal when they’re relaxed. Sit with them quietly, focusing on your breathing and imagining your energies drawing closer together. Even if they’re not physically close by (like a wild bird or a feral cat), imagine your energies meeting.

3) When you feel relaxed and ready, ask your animal a simple question. The answer may come quickly, as an image, a feeling or a single word. Trust what you get – doubting yourself is the quickest way to shut down the link.

I find that my first impressions are usually the most accurate, and I’ve proven this by logging my “critter conversations” and checking back later.

 So learn to trust what you’re receiving.

If you find yourself getting frustrated, settle down and breathe again. Learning to trust your instincts takes time and patience, but it’s a skill that will serve you well, not just with animals, but in everyday life.

And when you’re done talking with your furry companion, remember to say “thank you.”  Good manners aren’t just for the two-legged types.

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2 responses to “Talk to Your Pet: Some How-To’s

  1. Very interesting post! I learned a lot from your suggestions. 🙂

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